Parcel Ties

Parcel Ties (also known as "Tie Codes") are used to identify parcels that must be dealt with at the same time when registering a change against those parcels.  Parcel Ties are necessary to ensure our registry databases comply with the provisions of section 121 of The Planning and Development Act, 2007.

Why are parcel ties used?
Parcel ties are necessary to ensure that our registry databases comply with the provisions of section 121 of The Planning and Development Act, 2007. This section deems certain areas of land to be a single parcel for the purposes of planning and development. As a single parcel, the tied parcels cannot be transferred or dealt with independently of each other, except with planning approval.  

What parcels are tied?

Under The Planning and Development Act, 2007, a parcel is deemed to be a single parcel if it is separated only by a natural boundary or a plan of survey (e.g. A quarter section is a single parcel even if a road, railway or river runs through it).  
 
Parcels can also be tied if planning approval was provided pursuant to The Planning and Development Act, 2007 (or a prior version of the Planning and Development Act), conditional upon certain parcels being treated as a single parcel. For example, if a lot had been expanded by a metes and bounds description to include part of the adjacent lot, it is likely that the planning approval would require the lot and the adjacent metes and bounds description to be tied.  
 
Parcel ties will also be placed where the parcels were subdivided before planning approval was required, but the partial lots are now too small to comply with the minimum dimension requirements of The Planning and Development Act, 2007.  
 
Parcel ties were applied to all converted parcels that appeared on the same paper title,  where the land described contained at least one Metes and Bounds exception or description.  It also tied parcels where the land described contained at least one plan exception and more than one parcel with the same land description was generated. Parcel ties were applied by the system. There was no human discretion applied at the time that the parcel ties are placed. There will be some cases in which the parcel tie is not necessary and can be removed.

What is the effect of having tied parcels?
The system will not permit title to one of the tied parcels to be transferred unless titles to all tied parcels are transferred at the same time. The parcel tie must be removed or all titles to all tied parcels must be dealt with at the same time in the same way. Therefore, if an individual owns two parcels that are tied, that person cannot transfer the title to one of the parcels without transferring the title to the other parcel to the same new owner. 

How do I know if a parcel is tied?

Parcel ties are noted at the bottom of the title as follows: 

"Notes:
Under The Planning and Development Act, 2007, the title for this parcel and parcels 105104214 may not be transferred or, in certain circumstances, mortgaged or leased separately without the approval of the appropriate planning authority. If you believe this restriction does not apply to this parcel, please contact 1-866 ASK-ISC1 to have the restriction reviewed." 

There is also a reference on the title information screen.

How do I get the parcel tie removed?
If the parcel tie has been placed on parcels that came from a single paper title, but those parcels are not required to be tied for planning and development reasons, ISC will remove the tie to permit those parcels to be transferred independently. Please contact our Customer Support team to determine whether this situation applies. 
 
If the parcels are tied for planning and development reasons, the parcel tie can be removed upon approval of a new plan separating the parcels. 

Related Information:
Parcel Tie Amendments - Here you will find information on how to create, remove or amend parcel ties.
Parcel Ties Manual - This document explains some of the background related to parcel ties, the process for requesting a review of parcel ties, and some information related to the determination of whether parcel ties are valid or not.  It also explains some of the particular considerations when dealing with transforms.

Here are today's forecasted turnaround times:
Tie Code Validations: 2 business days